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As part of the reaffirmation process, Virginia Tech must document compliance with 86 core requirements, comprehensive standards, and federal requirements.

The following description of the Compliance Certification appears in the 2008 SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation:

The Compliance Certification, submitted approximately fifteen months in advance of an institution’s scheduled reaffirmation, is a document completed by the institution that demonstrates its judgment of the extent of its compliance with each of the Core Requirements, Comprehensive Standards, and Federal Requirements. Signatures by the institution’s chief executive officer and accreditation liaison are required to certify compliance. By signing the document, the individuals certify that the process of institutional self-assessment has been thorough, honest, and forthright, and that the information contained in the document is truthful, accurate, and complete.

The On-Site Review Committee is responsible for creating the final report that will be forwarded to the institution and to the Commission. Normally, the On-Site Review Committee will not reevaluate an Off-Site Committee’s determination of “compliance” unless additional information becomes available during the visit; however, standards indicated by an asterisk will be reviewed by the On-Site Committee regardless of compliance determination during the off-site review. This is required to ensure that institutions eligible to receive federal financial aid meet criteria established by the U.S. Secretary of Education. These standards would also be reviewed in a mini – compliance report in the Fifth-Year review.  

The standards with an asterisk are as follows:

Core Requirements 2.8 and 2.10; Comprehensive Standards 3.2.8, 3.3.1, 3.4.3, 3.4.11, 3.10.3, 3.11.3; and Federal Requirements (those that have not been incorporated into Sections 2 and 3 of the Principles) 4.1 thru 4.7.

 

Click the tabs below for the description each standard and requirement from the 2008 SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation

Section 2: Core Requirements

Core Requirements are basic, broad-based, foundational requirements that an institution must meet to be accredited with the Commission on Colleges. They establish a threshold of development required of an institution seeking initial or continued accreditation by the Commission and reflect the Commission’s basic expectations of candidate and member institutions. Compliance with the Core Requirements is not sufficient to warrant accreditation or reaffirmation of accreditation. Accredited institutions must also demonstrate compliance with the Comprehensive Standards and the Federal Requirements of the Principles, and the policies of the Commission. An applicant institution seeking candidacy is required to document compliance with Core Requirements 2.1 – 2.11 to be authorized a Candidacy Committee or to be awarded candidacy or candidacy renewal. An applicant/candidate institution is not required to document compliance with Core Requirement 2.12 until it undergoes its first review for reaffirmation following initial accreditation. (See Commission policy “Accreditation Procedures for Applicant Institutions.”) An accredited institution is required to document compliance with all Core Requirements, including Core Requirement 2.12, before it can be reaffirmed. If an institution fails to document compliance, the Commission will place the institution on sanction or take adverse action. (See Commission policy “Sanctions, Denial of Reaffirmation, and Removal from Membership.”) Core Requirement 2.12 requires an institution to develop an acceptable Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP). Engaging the wider academic community, the QEP is based upon a comprehensive and thorough analysis of the effectiveness of the learning environment for supporting student learning and accomplishing the mission of the institution. Implicit in every Core Requirement mandating a policy or procedure is the expectation that the policy or procedure is in writing and has been approved through appropriate institutional processes, published in appropriate institutional documents accessible to those affected by the policy or procedure, and implemented and enforced by the institution.

The institution has degree-granting authority from the appropriate government agency or agencies.

The institution has a governing board of at least five members that is the legal body with specific authority over the institution. The board is an active policy-making body for the institution and is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the financial resources of the institution are adequate to provide a sound educational program. The board is not controlled by a minority of board members or by organizations or interests separate from it. Both the presiding officer of the board and a majority of other voting members of the board are free of any contractual, employment, or personal or familial financial interest in the institution.

A military institution authorized and operated by the federal government to award degrees has a public board on which both the presiding officer and a majority of the other members are neither civilian employees of the military nor active/retired military. The board has broad and significant influence upon the institution’s programs and operations, plays an active role in policy-making, and ensures that the financial resources of the institution are used to provide a sound educational program.

The board is not controlled by a minority of board members or by organizations or interests separate from the board except as specified by the authorizing legislation. Both the presiding officer of the board and a majority of other voting board members are free of any contractual, employment, or personal or familial financial interest in the institution.

The institution has a chief executive officer whose primary responsibility is to the institution and who is not the presiding officer of the board.

The institution has a clearly defined and published mission statement that is specific to the institution and appropriate for higher education.  The missions addresses teaching and learning and, where applicable, research and public service.

The institution engages in ongoing, integrated, and institution-wide research-based planning and evaluation processes that (1) incorporate a systematic review of institutional mission, goals, and outcomes; (2) result in continuing improvement in institutional quality; and (3) demonstrate the institution is effectively accomplishing its mission.

The institution is in operation and has students enrolled in degree programs.

The institution offers one or more degree programs based on at least 60 semester credit hours or the equivalent at the associate level; at least 120 semester credit hours or the equivalent at the baccalaureate level; or at least 30 semester credit hours or the equivalent at the post-baccalaureate, graduate, or professional level. If an institution uses a unit other than semester credit hours, it provides an explanation for the equivalency. The institution also provides a justification for all degrees that include fewer than the required number of semester credit hours or its equivalent unit.

The institution offers degree programs that embody a coherent course of study that is compatible with its stated mission and is based upon fields of study appropriate to higher education.

In each undergraduate degree program, the institution requires the successful completion of a general education component at the collegiate level that:
(1) is a substantial component of each undergraduate degree,
(2) ensures breadth of knowledge, and
(3) is based on a coherent rationale.

For degree completion in associate programs, the component constitutes a minimum of 15 semester hours or the equivalent; for baccalaureate programs, a minimum of 30 semester hours or the equivalent. These credit hours are to be drawn from and include at least one course from each of the following areas: humanities/fine arts; social/behavioral sciences; and natural science/mathematics. The courses do not narrowly focus on those skills, techniques, and procedures specific to a particular occupation or profession. If an institution uses a unit other than semester credit hours, it provides an explanation for the equivalency. The institution also provides a justification if it allows for fewer than the required number of semester credit hours or its equivalent unit of general education courses.

The institution provides instruction for all course work required for at least one degree program at each level at which it awards degrees. If the institution does not provide instruction for all such course work and (1) makes arrangements for some instruction to be provided by other accredited institutions or entities through contracts or consortia or (2) uses some other alternative approach to meeting this requirement, the alternative approach must be approved by the Commission on Colleges. In both cases, the institution demonstrates that it controls all aspects of its educational program. (See Commission policy “Core Requirement 2.7.4: Documenting an Alternate Approach.”)

The number of full-time faculty members is adequate to support the mission of the institution and to ensure the quality and integrity of its academic programs. Upon application for candidacy, an applicant institution demonstrates that it meets the comprehensive standard for faculty qualifications.

The institution, through ownership or formal arrangements or agreements, provides and supports student and faculty access and user privileges to adequate library collections and services and to other learning/information resources consistent with the degrees offered. Collections, resources, and services are sufficient to support all its educational, research, and public service programs.

The institution provides student support programs, services, and activities consistent with its mission that promote student learning and enhance the development of its students.

The institution has a sound financial base and demonstrated financial stability to support the mission of the institution and the scope of its programs and services.

The member institution provides the following financial statements: (1) an institutional audit (or Standard Review Report issued in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the AICPA for those institutions audited as part of a systemwide or statewide audit) and written institutional management letter for the most recent fiscal year prepared by an independent certified public accountant and/or an appropriate governmental auditing agency employing the appropriate audit (or Standard Review Report) guide; (2) a statement of financial position of unrestricted net assets, exclusive of plant assets and plant-related debt, which represents the change in unrestricted net assets attributable to operations for the most recent year; and (3) an annual budget that is preceded by sound planning, is subject to sound fiscal procedures, and is approved by the governing board.

Audit requirements for applicant institutions may be found in the Commission policy “Accreditation Procedures for Applicant Institutions.”

The institution has adequate physical resources to support the mission of the institution and the scope of its programs and services.

The institution has developed an acceptable Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) that: (1) includes a broad-based institutional process identifying key issues emerging from institutional assessment, (2) focuses on learning outcomes and/or the environment supporting student learning and accomplishing the mission of the institution, (3) demonstrates institutional capability for the initiation, implementation, and completion of the QEP, (4) includes broad-based involvement of institutional constituencies in the development and proposed implementation of the QEP, and (5) identifies goals and a plan to assess their achievement.

(Note: This requirement is not addressed by the institution in its Compliance Certification.)

Section 3: Comprehensive Standards

The Comprehensive Standards set forth requirements in the following four areas: (1) institutional mission, governance, and effectiveness; (2) programs; (3) resources; and (4) institutional responsibility for Commission policies. The Comprehensive Standards are more specific to the operations of the institution, represent good practice in higher education, and establish a level of accomplishment expected of all member institutions. If an institution is judged to be significantly out of compliance with one or more of the Comprehensive Standards, its reaffirmation of accreditation may be denied.

(See Commission policy “Sanctions, Denial of Reaffirmation, and Removal from Membership.”)

A candidate institution is required to document compliance with Core Requirements 2.1-2.11 and all the Comprehensive Standards and Federal Requirements in order to be awarded initial membership.

Implicit in every Comprehensive Standard mandating a policy or procedure is the expectation that the policy or procedure is in writing and has been approved through appropriate institutional processes, published in appropriate institutional documents accessible to those affected by the policy or procedure, and implemented and enforced by the institution.

Institutional Mission, Governance, and Effectiveness

3.1.1: Mission

The mission statement is current and comprehensive, accurately guides the institution’s operations, is periodically reviewed and updated, is approved by the governing board, and is communicated to the institution’s constituencies.

3.2.1: CEO evaluation/selection
The governing board of the institution is responsible for the selection and the periodic evaluation of the chief executive officer.

 

3.2.2: Governing board control

The legal authority and operating control of the institution are clearly defined for the following areas within the institution’s governance structure:

3.2.2.1 institution’s mission;

3.2.2.2 fiscal stability of the institution;

3.2.2.3 institutional policy, including policies concerning related and affiliated corporate entities and all auxiliary services; and

3.2.2.4 related foundations (athletic, research, etc.) and other corporate entities whose primary purpose is to support the institution and/or its programs.

 

3.2.3: Board conflict of interest

The board has a policy addressing conflict of interest for its members.

 

3.2.4: External influence

The governing board is free from undue influence from political, religious, or other external bodies and protects the institution from such influence.

 

3.2.5: Board dismissal

The governing board has a policy whereby members can be dismissed only for appropriate reasons and by a fair process.

 

3.2.6: Board/administration distinction

There is a clear and appropriate distinction, in writing and practice, between the policy-making functions of the governing board and the responsibility of the administration and faculty to administer and implement policy.

 

3.2.7: Organizational structure

The institution has a clearly defined and published organizational structure that delineates responsibility for the administration of policies.

 

3.2.8: Qualified administrative/academic officers*

The institution has qualified administrative and academic officers with the experience, competence, and capacity to lead the institution.

 

3.2.9: Faculty/staff appointment

The institution defines and publishes policies regarding appointment and employment of faculty and staff.

 

3.2.10: Administrative staff evaluations

The institution evaluates the effectiveness of its administrators on a periodic basis.

 

3.2.11: Control of intercollegiate athletics

The institution’s chief executive officer has ultimate responsibility for, and exercises appropriate administrative and fiscal control over, the institution’s intercollegiate athletics program. 

 

3.2.12: Fund-raising activities

The institution’s chief executive officer controls the institution’s fund-raising activities exclusive of institution-related foundations that are independent and separately incorporated.

 

3.2.13: Institution-related foundations

Any institution-related foundation not controlled by the institution has a contractual or other formal agreement that (1) accurately describes the relationship between the institution and the foundation and (2) describes any liability associated with that relationship. In all cases, the institution ensures that the relationship is consistent with its mission

 

3.2.14: Intellectual property rights

The institution’s policies are clear concerning ownership of materials, compensation, copyright issues, and the use of revenue derived from the creation and production of all intellectual property. These policies apply to students, faculty, and staff.

3.3.1: Institutional Effectiveness*

The institution identifies expected outcomes, assesses the extent to which it achieves these outcomes, and provides evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results in each of the following areas:

3.3.1.1 educational programs, to include student learning outcomes;

3.3.1.2 administrative support services;

3.3.1.3 educational support services;

3.3.1.4 research within its educational mission, if appropriate;

3.3.1.5 community/public service within its educational mission, if appropriate.

Programs

All Educational Programs (includes all on-campus, off-campus, and distance learning programs and course work) (See Commission policy “Distance Education.”)

3.4.1: Academic program approval

The institution demonstrates that each educational program for which academic credit is awarded is approved by the faculty and the administration.

 

3.4.2: Continuing education/service programs

The institution’s continuing education, outreach, and service programs are consistent with the institution’s mission.

 

3.4.3: Admissions policies*

The institution publishes admissions policies that are consistent with its mission.

 

3.4.4: Acceptance of academic credit

The institution has a defined and published policy for evaluating, awarding, and accepting credit for transfer, experiential learning, advanced placement, and professional certificates that is consistent with its mission and ensures that course work and learning outcomes are at the collegiate level and comparable to the institution’s own degree programs. The institution assumes responsibility for the academic quality of any course work or credit recorded on the institution’s transcript. (See Commission policy “The Transfer or Transcripting of Academic Credit.”)

 

3.4.5: Academic policies

The institution publishes academic policies that adhere to principles of good educational practice. These are disseminated to students, faculty, and other interested parties through publications that accurately represent the programs and services of the institution.

 

3.4.6: Practices for awarding credit

The institution employs sound and acceptable practices for determining the amount and level of credit awarded for courses, regardless of format or mode of delivery.

 

3.4.7: Consortial relationships/contractual agreements

The institution ensures the quality of educational programs and courses offered through consortial relationships or contractual agreements, ensures ongoing compliance with the comprehensive requirements, and evaluates the consortial relationship and/or agreement against the purpose of the institution.

 

3.4.8: Noncredit to credit

The institution awards academic credit for course work taken on a noncredit basis only when there is documentation that the noncredit course work is equivalent to a designated credit experience.

 

3.4.9: Academic support services

The institution provides appropriate academic support services.

 

3.4.10: Responsibility for curriculum

The institution places primary responsibility for the content, quality, and effectiveness of the curriculum with its faculty.

 

3.4.11: Academic program coordination*

For each major in a degree program, the institution assigns responsibility for program coordination, as well as for curriculum development and review, to persons academically qualified in the field. In those degree programs for which the institution does not identify a major, this requirement applies to a curricular area or concentration.

 

3.4.12: Technology use

The institution’s use of technology enhances student learning and is appropriate for meeting the objectives of its programs. Students have access to and training in the use of technology.

3.5.1: College-level competencies

The institution identifies college-level general education competencies and the extent to which graduates have attained them.

 

3.5.2: Institutional credits for a degree

At least 25 percent of the credit hours required for the degree are earned through instruction offered by the institution awarding the degree. In the case of undergraduate degree programs offered through joint, cooperative, or consortia arrangements, the student earns 25 percent of the credits required for the degree through instruction offered by the participating institutions. (See Commission policy “The Transfer or Transcripting of Academic Credit.”)

 

3.5.3: Undergraduate program requirements

The institution defines and publishes requirements for its undergraduate programs, including its general education components. These requirements conform to commonly accepted standards and practices for degree programs.

 

3.5.4: Terminal degrees of faculty

At least 25 percent of the discipline course hours in each major at the baccalaureate level are taught by faculty members holding the terminal degree—usually the earned doctorate—in the discipline, or the equivalent of the terminal degree.

3.6.1 The institution’s post-baccalaureate professional degree programs, master’s and doctoral degree programs, are progressively more advanced in academic content than its undergraduate programs.(Post-baccalaureate program rigor)

 

3.6.2 The institution structures its graduate curricula (1) to include knowledge of the literature of the discipline and (2) to ensure ongoing student engagement in research and/or appropriate professional practice and training experiences. (Graduate curriculum)

 

3.6.3 The majority of credits toward a graduate or a post-baccalaureate professional degree are earned through instruction offered by the institution awarding the degree. In the case of graduate and postbaccalaureate professional degree programs offered through joint, cooperative, or consortial arrangements, the student earns a majority of credits through instruction offered by the participating institutions. (See Commission policy “The Transfer or Transcripting of Academic Credit.”) (Institutional credits for a degree)

 

3.6.4 The institution defines and publishes requirements for its graduate and post-baccalaureate professional programs. These requirements conform to commonly accepted standards and practices for degree programs. (Post-baccalaureate program requirements)

3.7.1: Faculty competence

The institution employs competent faculty members qualified to accomplish the mission and goals of the institution. When determining acceptable qualifications of its faculty, an institution gives primary consideration to the highest earned degree in the discipline. The institution also considers competence, effectiveness, and capacity, including, as appropriate, undergraduate and graduate degrees, related work experiences in the field, professional licensure and certifications, honors and awards, continuous documented excellence in teaching, or other demonstrated competencies and achievements that contribute to effective teaching and student learning outcomes. For all cases, the institution is responsible for justifying and documenting the qualifications of its faculty. (See Commission guidelines “Faculty Credentials.”)

 

3.7.2: Faculty evaluation

The institution regularly evaluates the effectiveness of each faculty member in accord with published criteria, regardless of contractual or tenured status.

 

3.7.3: Faculty development

The institution provides ongoing professional development of faculty as teachers, scholars, and practitioners.

 

3.7.4: Academic freedom

The institution ensures adequate procedures for safeguarding and protecting academic freedom.

 

3.7.5: Faculty role in governance

The institution publishes policies on the responsibility and authority of faculty in academic and governance matters.

3.8.1: Learning/information resources

The institution provides facilities and learning/information resources that are appropriate to support its teaching, research, and service mission.

 

3.8.2: Instruction of library use

The institution ensures that users have access to regular and timely instruction in the use of the library and other learning/information resources.

 

3.8.3: Qualified staff

The institution provides a sufficient number of qualified staff— with appropriate education or experiences in library and/or other learning/information resources—to accomplish the mission of the institution.

3.9.1: Student rights

The institution publishes a clear and appropriate statement of student rights and responsibilities and disseminates the statement to the campus community.

 

3.9.2: Student records

The institution protects the security, confidentiality, and integrity of student records and maintains special security measures to protect and back up data.

 

3.9.3: Qualified staff

The institution employs qualified personnel to ensure the quality and effectiveness of its student affairs programs.

Resources

3.10.1: Financial stability

The institution’s recent financial history demonstrates financial stability.

 

3.10.2: Submission of financial statements

The institution provides financial profile information on an annual basis and other measures of financial health as requested by the Commission. All information is presented accurately and appropriately and represents the total operation of the institution.

 

3.10.3: Financial aid audits*

The institution audits financial aid programs as required by federal and state regulations.

 

3.10.4: Control of finances

The institution exercises appropriate control over all its financial resources.

 

3.10.5: Control of sponsored research/external funds

The institution maintains financial control over externally funded or sponsored research and programs.

3.11.1: Control of physical resources

The institution exercises appropriate control over all its physical resources.

 

3.11.2: Institutional environment

The institution takes reasonable steps to provide a healthy, safe, and secure environment for all members of the campus community.

 

3.11.3: Physical facilities*

The institution operates and maintains physical facilities, both on and off campus, that appropriately serve the needs of the institution’s educational programs, support services, and other mission-related activities.

Institutional Responsibility for Commission Policies

The Commission on Colleges accredits the entire institution and its programs and services, wherever they are located or however they are delivered. Accreditation, specific to an institution, is based on conditions existing at the time of the most recent evaluation and is not transferable to other institutions or entities. When an accredited institution significantly modifies or expands its scope, changes the nature of its affiliation or its ownership, or merges with another institution, a substantive change review is required. The Commission is responsible for evaluating all substantive changes to assess the impact of the change on the institution’s compliance with defined standards. If an institution fails to follow the Commission’s procedures for notification and approval of substantive changes, its total accreditation may be placed in jeopardy. (See Commission policy “Substantive Change for Accredited Institutions.”) If an institution is unclear as to whether a change is substantive in nature, it should contact Commission staff for consultation. An applicant or candidate institution may not undergo substantive change prior to action on initial membership.

3.12.1: Substantive change

The institution notifies the Commission of changes in accordance with the substantive change policy and, when required, seeks approval prior to the initiation of changes.

The Commission’s philosophy of accreditation precludes denial of membership to a degree-granting institution of higher education on any ground other than an institution’s failure to meet the requirements of the Principles of Accreditation in the professional judgment of peer reviewers, or failure to comply with the policies of the Commission. (See Commission Web site for all current Commission policies: www.sacscoc.org.)

3.13.1: Policy compliance

The institution complies with the policies of the Commission on Colleges. (Note: This standard is not addressed by the institution in its Compliance Certification.)

The institution publishes the name of its primary accreditor and its address and phone number in accordance with federal requirements. In such a publication or Web site, the institution should indicate that the Commission is to be contacted only if there is evidence that appears to support an institution’s significant non-compliance with a requirement or standard. The institution is expected to be accurate in reporting to the public its status with the Commission. In order to meet these requirements, the institution lists the name, address, and telephone number in its catalog or Web site using one of the following statements:

(Name of member institution) is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award (name specific degree levels, such as associate, baccalaureate, masters, doctorate). Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of (name of member institution).

(Name of candidate institution) is a candidate for accreditation with the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award (name specific degree levels, such as associate, baccalaureate, masters, doctorate). Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4501 for questions about the status of (name of member institution).

No statement may be made about the possible future accreditation status with the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, nor may an institution use the logo or seal of the Southern Association in any of its publications or documents.

3.14.1: Publication of accreditation status

A member or candidate institution represents its accredited status accurately and publishes the name, address, and telephone number of the Commission in accordance with Commission requirements and federal policy.

The institution evaluates success with respect to student achievement including, as appropriate, consideration of course completion, state licensing examinations, and job placement rates.

The institution’s curriculum is directly related and appropriate to the purpose and goals of the institution and the diplomas, certificates, or degrees awarded.

The institution makes available to students and the public current academic calendars, grading policies, and refund policies.

Program length is appropriate for each of the institution’s educational programs.

The institution has adequate procedures for addressing written student complaints and is responsible for demonstrating that it follows those procedures when resolving student complaints. (See Commission policy “Complaint Procedures against the Commission or its Accredited Institutions.”)

Recruitment materials and presentations accurately represent the institution’s practices and policies.

The institution is in compliance with its program responsibilities under Title IV of the 1998 Higher Education Amendments. (In reviewing the institution’s compliance with these program responsibilities, the Commission relies on documentation forwarded to it by the U.S. Department of Education.)

The standards for SACSCOC are assigned to writers from across the University, the assignments can be found here:

VT SACSCOC Assignments Spring 2009

Downloads (VT PID required)

Contact Us

Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness (MC 0433)

North End 460, Suite 301
460 Turner Street NW
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA 24061

Tel: (540) 231-6994
Fax: (540) 231-7219

irinfo@vt.edu